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See What Two Master of Interior Architecture Alumni are Designing!

What are graduates of the UCLA Extension/Cal Poly Pomona Master of Interior Architecture program doing today? Being awesome, that’s what! Two alumni, Laurence Cartledge and Michelle Mulitz, are working at Lauren Rottet Studio and helped with this amazing cruise liner design project! Check it out:

Click here to read an article about this project that was published in Interior Design magazine!

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it! Click here.

Are you ready to take your design skills into the workforce? See what Job + Internship opportunities are available to you today!

Arc+ID Alum and Guidance Committee Member, Charrisse Johnston, elected to the 2016 National ASID Board of Directors!

We are excited to announce that Charrisse Johnston, one of our Master of Interior Architecture graduates and member of our Guidance Committee, has been elected to the Board of Directors for The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID).

Charrisse Johnston, ASID, Associate AIA
, is a past national ASID board member. Johnston is currently a firm-wide interior design practice leader and principal at Los Angeles–based Steinberg Architects. She has previous experience working as the senior associate and studio operations leader at Gensler.

 She also served as vice president of corporate planning at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, where she was responsible for managing their consolidated financial and strategic planning efforts.

The 2016 Board of Directors: Sandy Gordon, Charrisse Johnston, Sarah W. Colandro, Teresa Sowell, Denise Rush, Melanie Murata, and Eddy Schmitt; Images courtesy of ASID

The 2016 Board of Directors: Sandy Gordon, Charrisse Johnston, Sarah W. Colandro, Teresa Sowell, Denise Rush, Melanie Murata, and Eddy Schmitt; Images courtesy of ASID

The 2016 Board will be comprised three officers, seven directors-at-large, and one industry partner representative. Randy Fiser, ASID CEO, believes that each of the new board members will “propel ASID in to the future as the voice of the profession” with their “insights and strategic guidance.”

So what are the responsibilities and expectations of the ASID Board of Directors? As described on the ASID website, the main objective for the Board is “to advise, govern, oversee and set policy, [assist] in the leadership of ASID, and [act] as representation of the overall membership. The Board delegates to the Society’s executive vice president/CEO for the management of operations and resources.”

Charrisse’s position as the Chair-Elect will begin October 1, 2015.

 

 

The Story of Leslie Shapiro Joyal and the Happy Accident that led her to Success!

profile imageEverybody’s path in life is unique and can be full of unforgettable experiences. For UCLA Extension Architecture & Interior Design alum, Leslie Shapiro Joyal, those experiences started with a happy accident.

At an early age, Leslie was determined to become a successful painter—that is, until she accidentally stumbled upon design during her education at community college. “The drawing class I applied for was not open,” she recalls, “and my only option was a design composition class.” This “happy accident” ultimately led her to the Architecture & Interior Design program at UCLA Extension. The schedule was demanding and projects were challenging, but the experiences Leslie had during her education were priceless. “I had the opportunity to work with some of Los Angeles’ design luminaries – including interior designer Kerry Joyce, textile designer Jack Lenor Larsen, and gallery owner Mark Krasne.

After graduating in 1991, she was hired as design assistant to modernist architect Frank Israel. It was in this studio that she felt her sensibilities evolve. Only a few years later, she opened her own interior design company shapiro joyal studio, which also features some of her custom designed furniture pieces.

To add to her list of amazing life experiences, Leslie was chosen to participate on the hit HGTV reality show Ellen’s Design Challenge, created by Ellen DeGeneres. When she received a random email from her casting agency inviting her to apply to a reality show about furniture designers, she glanced at it for a second, deleted it, but then thought “why not” and resurrected it from email trash. After tons of interviews and paperwork, Leslie finally received the news that she would be competing on live TV among five other designers for a chance to win $100,000 and the opportunity to see their work featured in HGTV Magazine. Unfortunately, Leslie was eliminated early, but just being recognized for her talent, being selected among hundreds of other applicants, and having the opportunity to compete was, as Leslie put it, “truly one of the highlights of my career.”

We asked Leslie to share some advice based of her life experiences. Here’s her insightful tips:

  1. Be prepared. There will, absolutely, be a moment in your career that is a potential game changer. Be ready for it. Keep taking classes, and keep meeting people. Connections are your biggest asset. You will learn things from people you like, and people you don’t like, and through those experiences you will form your own voice.
  2. Be courageous! Walk head first into what scares you. In 1985, I went to a showroom on a field trip that I fell in love with. I knew I had to work there. I waited until the tour was over, pulled the owner aside, and begged him to give me an interview. I got the job and on my first day, right before the elevator doors opened, I took a deeeeep breath and walked into the next chapter of my life.
  3. Be YOU! My final piece of advice, and I know how cliché it sounds, but it is true for me. Listen to your inner voice. Let you be you. You may be doubted, and you may be told that your ways are wrong. Stand your ground! As artists, you are the rule breakers, and you are the ones that change the paradigm. Own and unleash your artistic spirit so that others can benefit from it. What is often misunderstood at first usually becomes the beloved. Don’t be afraid to be different, and let your inner sense guide the way.

Below, enjoy a collection of images from Leslie’s career as a designer and (brief) career as a reality TV star:

Platinum winner - Awards for Design Excellence. The ADEX Awards is the Largest and most prestigious awards competition in the architecture and design industry.

Platinum winner – Awards for Design Excellence. The ADEX Awards is the Largest and most prestigious awards competition in the architecture and design industry.

Risser Nesting Tables

Risser Nesting Tables

Interior Design by Leslie on Kings Road

Competitors on the HGTV reality show Ellen's Design Challenge

Competitors on the HGTV reality show Ellen’s Design Challenge

As seen on Ellen's Design Challenge, designer Leslie Shapiro Joyal (left) and lead carpenter David Sheinkopf (right)  team up to create unique furniture designs.

As seen on Ellen’s Design Challenge, designer Leslie Shapiro Joyal (left) and lead carpenter David Sheinkopf (right) team up to create unique furniture designs.

 

To see Leslie’s full collection, click here.

To see more images from the HGTV show Ellen’s Design Challenge, click here.

We are so grateful to have Leslie share her exciting adventures with us! If you have a success story, we want to hear about it! Click here.

 

Ashley Maxwell, an Arc+ID Alumnus, shares her success story!

AshleyMaxwell-headshotAshley Maxwell is a 2007 graduate from UCLA Extension’s Architecture and Interior Design program, a NCIDQ Certified Interior Designer, and LEED Accredited Professional. She currently is the Lead Senior Interior Designer for the Cuningham Group Architecture’s Los Angeles office location and her efforts are focused in the Heal Studio. Prior to attending UCLA Extension, Ashley received her Bachelor of Arts in Architecture with a Minor in Fine Arts from Clemson University in South Carolina. She is currently enrolled in UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health to obtain her Masters in Public Health (MPH) with a concentration in Community Health Sciences and will graduate in August 2015.

“One of the greatest aspects of UCLA Extension’s Arc+ID program,” Ashley explains, “was the flexible course schedule that allowed me to concurrently begin a design career in Los Angeles.” Her favorite classes included Color Theory and the various Design Studios. Although the coursework was rigorous, it provided an excellent foundation for her career. The program also provided her with opportunities to participate in internships at prestigious hospitality firms in Los Angeles such as Hirsch Bedner Associates and Zebrowski Design Group. During school and immediately following graduation, Ashley worked at Zebrowski Design Group and then SF Jones Architects in Marina Del Rey, CA, where her design work focused on hotels, restaurant and lounge projects.

In 2008, Ashley’s career shifted focus to healthcare and medical research projects. She gained valuable experience in both medical planning and healthcare interior design while working at Zakian Woo Architects and HOK in Los Angeles. Ashley endeavors to collaborate with key stakeholders in each project to develop the most appropriate, evidence based and creative design solutions. Her passion for design is dedicated to promoting health equity, sustainability and preventative wellness through the built environment. Ashley strives to raise awareness of the impacts of planning and design on population health and encourages collaboration between the design community and public health advocates to promote the incorporation of evidence based design and behavioral theory concepts into all projects, resulting in healthier and move livable communities.

To the current students in the Arc+ID program, Ashley has some words of wisdom: “Begin establishing your professional network while in school. Joining a student chapter of a Professional Organizations in Los Angeles (eg. IIDA, ASID, AIA, AWA+D) and volunteering on various committees will help you meet potential employers, develop good communication skills, refine your design interests, and learn more about the different career opportunities within the design community.”

Below is a collection of images from projects that Ashley worked on from various stages in her career:

UCLA Neuropsychiatric Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

UCLA Neuropsychiatric Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

UCLA Neuropsychiatric Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

UCLA Neuropsychiatric Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

Cedars Sinai Medical Center / Cardiac Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

Cedars Sinai Medical Center / Cardiac Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

Cedars Sinai Medical Center / Cardiac Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

Cedars Sinai Medical Center / Cardiac Research Center / Los Angeles, CA

Mission City Community Network / Community Clinic / Los Angeles, CA

Mission City Community Network / Community Clinic / Los Angeles, CA

Kaiser Permanente / Regional Medical Laboratory / Chino Hills, CA

Kaiser Permanente / Regional Medical Laboratory / Chino Hills, CA

Kaiser Permanente / Medical Office Building / Santa Monica, CA

Kaiser Permanente / Medical Office Building / Santa Monica, CA

Kaiser Permanente / Medical Office Building / Santa Monica, CA

Kaiser Permanente / Medical Office Building / Santa Monica, CA

 

We are so grateful to have Ashley share her exciting accomplishments with us! If you have a success story, we want to hear about it! Click here.

 

Congratulations to Dani Mankey, winner of the $1,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award!

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Sometimes all it takes is the energy of a city to truly inspire us. Dani Mankey has studied all over the world, but when she moved to Los Angeles from Seattle in 2004 and became exposed to the city’s exquisite and unique creative spaces, the wheels in her creative mind began to turn. “The urge to create those spaces came to me,” she explained. And so, she started the UCLA Extension Architecture + Interior Design program in the Fall 2014 quarter. Only a few quarters in, she’s already starting to plan out her career path. However, like many starting students, the biggest struggle is pinpointing exactly what that will be. “My love of textures and patterns makes me think I would enjoy a more specialized industry such as tiling or textiles,” Dani decided, “but I really love creating atmospheres for friends and families to enjoy and therefore residential, hotel and restaurant design also have my attention.”

After her first quarter of classes, Dani was amazed by the by how much she has learned already and was able to apply that knowledge as well as her inherent talents into a scholarship-worthy project. Dani’s project from Eleanor Schrader’s class on the Fundamentals of Interior Architecture encapsulates the design sense of William van Alen, the architect and designer of the Chrysler Building in Manhattan, New York, which exemplifies the Art Deco style of the 1920s. She wanted to expose the more ambitious aspects of the Art Deco movement that had eclectic influences during its time. So, in her project, she included the mosaic-like lotus flower and Egyptian motif plus marble and wood elements in order to capture the true essence of the design by showing how architecture at the time was influenced by world travel.

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The creativity that she brought to her project was recognized by the scholarship committee and thus she was granted the $1,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award. Not only has the winnings enabled her to sign up for more classes without financial worries, she was given a boost of energy and excitement for continuing the Arc+ID program. “[The scholarship] provided me with a much-needed reminder that I was on the right path to my next career journey.”

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The James R. Northcutt Scholarship for Beginning Students is a $1,000 tuition credit that is granted to one student each quarter who completes the Fundamentals of Interior Architecture course. The award is based upon the caliber of work demonstrated in required class projects. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it! Click here.

 

 

Congratulations to Christel Ferguson, winner of the $1,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award!

Christel Ferguson is one of those students who set out in life on one path only to realize that her true passion is interior design. “I had the eye for design,” Christel discovered, “but not the knowledge to back it up.” So she jumped paths and enrolled in the Interior Design Certificate program at UCLA Extension—and could not be happier! “I thought I would take a class or two in interior design at UCLA Extension to see if it was a good fit for me,” she stated, “I was hooked after my first class with Eleanor Schrader and now plan to finish the certificate program.”

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The final project in Eleanor’s Fundamentals of Interior Architecture class involves students creating presentation boards based on an interior designer or architect that has inspired them over the past quarter. Christel chose to do her project on one of the guest speakers from the class, Jonathon Fong. “It was so fun to put the project together. When I found out later that I won the James Northcutt Scholarship it confirmed, for me, that I’m on the right path.”

Christel’s advice for anyone who is thinking about taking classes in interior design is to just jump right in and start. “You never know until you try it,” she states, “I have learned so much in such a short amount of time.”

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The James R. Northcutt Scholarship for Beginning Students is a $1,000 tuition credit that is granted to one student each quarter who completes the Fundamentals of Interior Architecture course. The award is based upon the caliber of work demonstrated in required class projects. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it! Click here.

Congratulations to Carrie Cheung, winner of the $3,000 Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship Award!

carrie

With a Bachelor’s degree in Architectural Studies and over two years of work experience in architectural firms, international student Carrie Cheung, left her homeland of Hong Kong in December 2013 to pursue the Master of Interior Architecture program at UCLA Extension. “I believe studying abroad can widen my horizon,” Carrie stated in regards to her move to Los Angeles, “and bring me new inspiration and perspectives.”

While living in Hong Kong, Carrie worked on a number of upscale projects which included mix-use development in Mainland China, international competitions, theme park and casino development in Macau, and domestic projects in Hong Kong. “Having the opportunities to be part of those mega-scale projects and collaborating with the whole spectrum of expertise,” Carrie explained, “I found a need to further equip myself to the profession, with knowledge of the interior design discipline.”

Carrie has now completed the majority of classes in the Master’s program, including Studio III with Apurva Pande, the instructor who recognized her strong knack for design and nominated her for the Howard Hirsch scholarship. Carrie’s goal is to graduate by Summer 2015, after which she plans to apply the specialized skills and knowledge that she’ll gain from the Masters program to become a well-rounded architectural designer.

To find out what it takes to win the Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship, we interviewed Carrie about her project and also asked her some questions that prospective students would find valuable:

Please describe your project:
This is an adaptation project in a neo-classical building in Downtown LA. I preserved the arch windows, octagonal columns and the gold-leaf ceiling, and introduce a minimal, contemporary design to make a harmony. We were required to design a 3000 sq.ft. commercial space containing workspace and retail area, and, part of them can be converted to host Pop-up events. I challenge the limit of Pop-up, by creating a highly convertible shared workspace. It is an up-cycling furniture design studio at the daytime, and switches its function to design workshop and social forum after office hour. My design is established on the concept of folding tectonic. I include convertible furniture and sliding partition to meet the needs of different scenario.

First of all, I strategically included a transitional common zone between the retail (Public Area) and office (Private Area) during the space planning stage. The transitional zone refers to reception, conference room and café/rest area. Then, in response to the characteristic of the existing site, I developed a skewed grid as the principle in allocating my programs. The skewed grid gave me a lot more potential in developing interesting geometry when I was applying my design concept to create the central partition. The resulted sculptural central partition made a statement for my project.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?
As Pop-up space is one of the required programs in the project, I developed my concept, folding tectonic, basing on the pop-up paper art. I researched on some paper art forms and made a series of paper models to study the relationship between folding and volume growth, to seek a suitable form for my design. By combining the skewed grid which I developed in the early stage of my project, the pop-up paper models meet the spatial and functional needs, also with an elegant geometric shape.

How will the scholarship help you meet your career goals and aspirations?
I am very grateful for this scholarship, which allows me to spare some money from the tuition in the Master Program. However, spend them on some other meaningful ways of building my design capacity and getting inspirations, for instance, purchasing model making tools and materials; reference books; exhibition tickets and traveling.

What is the best piece of advice you can offer to prospective Master of Interior Architecture students?
Studios in the Master of Interior Architecture Program stress on striking a balance between creativity and practicality. Supported by other courses, such as the understanding of building code, ecology of design and project management, studios provide a dynamic testing ground for students to explore, establish and develop interior design ideas. It is intense, yet a very rewarding program, where I get inspired at every class, especially when I am collaborating with colleagues and instructors with diverse cultural and professional backgrounds. The training in this program makes me confident in pursuing my dream to be a successful architectural designer in the future.

Images of Carrie Cheung’s project:

The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship for Advanced Students a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted once a year to Masters students who have completed all classes up to and including Interior Architecture Studio III. The award is based upon the work demonstrated in projects from Interior Architecture Studio III. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

 

Congratulations to Romina Hausmann, winner of the $3,000 Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship Award!

romina

Since she was seventeen years old, Romina Hausmann knew that her professional career would evolve in the field of art and its relation to design. Before finding her true passion in architecture & interior design, she attended ESCAC (School of Cinema and Audiovisuals of Catalonia) for 4 years, specializing in Art Direction, where she worked alongside Hollywood professionals such as film producer and director Steven Soderbergh as well as art director Iñigo Navarro.

After several years of working in the industry, Romina developed a growing interest in sustainability in the built environment. “I began to ask myself how I could use my love for art and architectural spaces in responsible designs,” Romina remarked, and ultimately decided that the best way to pursue this interest was through the UCLA Extension Architecture & Interior Design Certificate program.

During her education, Romina’s talents shone brightly—raising the attention of many of her instructors. Luis de Moraes, a UCLA Extension Design Studio II instructor, asked her to be his teaching assistant and has been enjoying her support for about a year now. Also, both Alex Dorfman (Design Communication III instructor) and Judith Corona (Elements of Design II instructor) requested that her outstanding work be showcased for the 2014 CIDA accreditation review. And just recently, her Studio III instructor, Apurva Pande, acknowledged her superior talents by recommending her as a candidate for the Howard Hirsch Scholarship. In addition to this scholarship, Romina is also the recipient of the Harold Grieve Scholarship offered through ASID on September 2014 as well as the Graduate Presidential Fellowship Award offered through Cal Poly Pomona on March 2015.

Earning her Certificate of Interior Design from UCLA Extension gave her the necessary knowledge of design to prepare her for the next step in her education: the Masters of Interior Architecture program at UCLA Extension via Cal Poly Pomona. Romina knew that by pursuing her Master’s degree, she would be able to better answer the needs of ecological design. “Finding sustainable design solutions is a long, ambitious and difficult road,” she states, “but there is no other way.” Romina, fluent in four major languages, plans to apply her learning experiences internationally, sharing her knowledge and creativity necessary for the development of a more ethically conscious, responsible, and better world.

To find out what it takes to win the Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship, we interviewed Romina about her project and also asked her some questions that prospective students would find valuable:

Please describe your project:
In Studio III, we had to come up with an idea for a commercial space that would be divided between retail area, working space and private area. From the beginning I knew I wanted to create an innovative design avoiding the conventional use of the walls and dividing the space with the product itself, using it as a partitions and display at the same time.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?
The strongest feature on my project is the relation between the product I’m selling (in this case the Shade Sails) and the partitions of the rooms. I was looking for an unconventional design that avoid the use of walls and instead use the product (Shade Sails) for display and partitions of the space. After experimenting with mock-up scale models, I came up with the idea of the Hyperbolic Paraboloid, which is directly related to the geometric form of the Shade Sail. After I found this relation it was easy to design the partitions based on this geometrical principle and use it at the same time as a display for the product.

How will the scholarship help you meet your career goals and aspirations?
The Howard Hirsch Scholarship will help me to continue my education on the Master Program in Interior Architecture at UCLA Extension/Cal Poly Pomona. It is really encouraging to know that your efforts and hard work is recognized. This will push me even further to keep experimenting and trying new creative and innovative points of view on my future designs.

What is the best piece of advice you can offer to prospective Master of Interior Architecture students?
I personally recommend trying to design every project from a holistic point of view. The best way to success is to experiment and try different options, trying to approach the project from a creative and also practical point of view. I strongly recommend experimenting with real architectural scale models. I would never have achieved my final results if it wasn’t for the tactile experience with the different materials and shapes I try to create. Computer comes last.

Images of Romina Hausmann’s project:

The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship for Advanced Students a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted once a year to Masters students who have completed all classes up to and including Interior Architecture Studio III. The award is based upon the work demonstrated in projects from Interior Architecture Studio III. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

 

Congratulations to Kimberly Porter, winner of the $3,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award!

Kim Porter

Kimberly Porter is what many instructors would call an outstanding student. She was nominated for the Northcutt Scholarship by her Studio II instructor, Rogerio Carvalheiro, who recognized her remarkable talent. Like many other students in the program, Kimberly career path began in an entirely different field—and it took a repeated bout of dissatisfaction for her to realize that she has a bright future in interior design ahead of her.

Frustrated while working in TV and film, Kimberly began wondering if she had chosen the right line of work. “If this doesn’t work out,” she thought, “I want to be an interior designer.” While taking on another TV job and then another with no avail, Kimberly enrolled in the Certificate of Interior Design program at UCLA Extension in Summer 2009 and was immediately hooked! Although she remained employed at her TV jobs while attending classes in her spare time, she knew it was time to move on from TV and jump wholeheartedly into Interior Design. So in Spring 2013, she switched gears to fulfil her Interior Design dreams.

During her education at UCLA Extension, she had the opportunity to work at a design firm in Pasadena that specializes in multi-family residential work. Kimberly’s employer sees great potential in her and has been extremely supportive of her educational path and growth as a designer. “I love going to work every day,” Kimberly stated enthusiastically, “I know I made the right move into this field of work!” In Fall 2014, Kimberly accomplished her goal of obtaining a Certificate of Interior Design and will be applying for her Master’s of Interior Architecture at UCLA Extension/Cal Poly Pomona this Spring 2015.

To find out what it takes to win the Northcutt Scholarship, we interviewed Kimberly about her project and also asked her some questions that prospective students would find valuable:

Please describe your project.
This project combines elements of the styles of architect Daniel Libeskind and fashion designer Prabal Gurung to create a live-work loft space intended for two design professionals living and working under the same roof. Both Libeskind’s and Gurung’s designs are dominated by geometric shapes, sharp angles, and asymmetry, which I used to create sculptural walls that divide the rooms in the space. One of the elements I was most drawn to in Libeskind’s designs was his affinity for adding highly stylized, modern and geometric elements to existing (sometimes historical) spaces, so I was very conscious of combining similar protruding shapes with more raw materials, like using existing concrete flooring throughout the common spaces and reclaimed wood facing for the walls throughout.

In space planning the 3-story loft space, I really considered how the space might be used both during work and personal time. In my own life, I value a separation between work and home life so the space is designed so that the people living there do not necessarily have to go through the home to access the work spaces, and vice versa.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?
Once I had researched the past works of Daniel Libeskind and Prabal Gurung, I started considering what kind of geometric elements would be most appropriate for this project, and how they would interact with the existing building. I played around with 3-dimensional shapes in SketchUp, inserting large independent iceberg-like shapes into the space, stretching and changing them until I saw what I was looking for. And then the real fun came in the details, like the floating staircases and railings, choosing finishes, and both finding existing and designing custom furnishings and lighting! I surprised myself by adding elements of copper throughout, an unexpected element of my own sense of style living amongst that of Libeskind and Gurung.

How will the scholarship help you meet your career goals and aspirations?
I am so grateful for this scholarship, which is allowing me to go on to the Master’s level and enhance my knowledge and skills as a designer. My primary goal will be to learn more about building systems, codes, and the business side of the interior design field.

From  your experiences in the Certificate of Interior Design program, what helpful insights would you share with prospective students?
I feel like all of the classes leading up to Studio II genuinely came together in that one class. Because of that, and incredible creative support and encouragement from Rogerio, I had a huge confidence boost working on this project and that increase in confidence has carried through to my professional life as well. It has even resulted in my promotion at work! All of this reinforces that I have chosen the right career, and I’m excited to discover what more is ahead.

Images of Kimberly Porter’s project:

The James R. Northcutt Scholarship for Advanced Students a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted twice a year to students who have completed Interior Architecture Studio II. The award is based upon the work demonstrated in projects from Interior Architecture Studio II. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.