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Congratulations to Jennifer Fong, winner of the $1,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award!

Photo by Gary Fong/Genesis Photos

Congratulations to Jennifer Fong on winning the $1,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award!

Please describe your project?

My project was originally submitted in the Fundamentals of Interior Architecture class.  The objective was to choose a famous designer/architect and create a poster presentation of their work and impact on design.  I chose the famous Spanish architect, Antoni Gaudi.  I was inspired by his innovations in areas of sustainability and the integration of structure with an aesthetic purpose.  My project focused primarily on Casa Batllo in Barcelona, Spain.  I took elements that were iconic to the structure and placed them cohesively on a poster board.  These elements included the “skull” balconies, recycled tile, and doors that opened to the interior attic space.  I took it a step further by integrating 3-dimensional paper-mache to the balcony skull and a pull-out 1-point perspective of the interior attic.  A battery powered light feature lit the depth of the room to emulate the actual light in the Casa Batllo.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?

Similar to understanding the design world, I took a very close look at what was successful in previous quarters projects.  After selecting my architect, I figured that the best posters had “special effect” elements integrated into them and thought that was an awesome way to communicate the architect’s work.  A picture of the interior attic space of the Casa Batllo also inspired me because the specific type of arch, a “drop-chain” arch, was also used as load-baring within the structure.

How will the scholarship help you meet your career goals and aspirations?

This scholarship is really a representation of God’s grace upon me.  I don’t deserve it, but I am so thankful for this portion of school funding.  This has helped me continue to take classes, as I hope to eventually complete the Masters of Interior Architecture degree.  I am honored that my ideas do matter, and I hope to use this award as a reminder to keep propelling forward in my studies.

From your experiences in the Certificate of Interior Design program, what helpful insights would you share with prospective students?

I’ve found that the people in this program want to grow just as much as you do.  Everyone is willing to help one another because we’re all trying to accomplish the same goal.  If you’re thinking about applying to this program, know that it can be rigorous at times, but you have people along side you to finish the race with.

The $1,000 James Northcutt Scholarship Award tuition credit award that is granted based upon the excellence of your work in the Fundamentals of Interior Design class. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

Congratulations to Khorshid Mazaheri, winner of the $3,000 Hirsch Bedner Scholarship Award!

Khorshid Mazaheri is a current student in the Advanced Level/Master’s Program.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?


In any design, concept is the core of the whole design process. Searching to see
and explore new innovating ideas, I chose an architect and an environmental artist
from whom I could be inspired. Japanese architect, Sou Fujimoto and Brazilian artist
Henrigue Oliveria. Fujimoto believes in “in between spaces”. Using pattern andrhythm, he creates an integrity by gathering different elements. Use artificial chaos to resemble natural order. Henrique creates interactive installations by wood. Resembling a suspended nature that has been created by human, breaking order in different ways to create a new organic one. As we are trying to use a very new concept of farming which is artificial to save the nature, we are creating a new approach of caring for nature which is in contrast with old visions of environmental concepts. So I decided to embrace this contrast and make it a focal point of the whole building by hanging the hydroponic cells from the ceiling and penetrate the roof to extend the concept outside of the building.

Please describe your project?

In this project, I tried to create one integrate system that works as a whole. I used shipping containers because they are practical, easy to use and also a symbol of the concept of reusing. The containers are hanged from the structure that I added to the building. Ten pillars, four in each sides and two in the middle. These also made it possible for me to detach the floors from the walls and create visual connection between different levels of my project. The levels are connected by ramps and the hydroponic cells can be reached by a catwalk that circulates the whole walls in upper level. In this way, the hanged containers are the focal point and they are visible all over the building.

We enter the project right into the restaurant which is the most crowded part of the building and the place in which people can communicate. This is a flexible building and it can be used for variety of purposes.  So during the day, it can be served as a community center, the market will sell hydroponic products and the gallery will exhibit art. At night, it will have a totally different look and application. The market will be used as a gathering area in celebrations and local events and the art gallery can be a performance place for plays and small concerts. To add to the flexibility of the building, the containers can move horizontally. By moving, they create variety of possibilities, spatially and visually. Also, they are covered with graffiti which is done by local artists and can be changed annually by another one. So the whole building is an exhibit of art.

Images of Khorshid Mazaheri ’s project:


The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship is a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted based upon the work demonstrated in projects commended not only for outstanding and innovative design solution, but also for the tremendous focus and professionalism displayed during the final design project.  To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

Congratulations to Shaghayegh Amirshaghaghi, winner of the $3,000 Hirsch Bedner Scholarship Award!

Shaghayegh Amirshaghaghi is a current student in the Advanced Level/Master’s Program. Prior to joining this program, she received a Bachelor degree in Historical Architecture and a Master degree in the Conservation of Historical Urban Context, both from the Art University, in Iran.  Shaghayegh is a world heritage fan! She had the opportunity of working in several historical sites in her home country, Iran. This includes conservation of the historical palace Aliqapoo in Esfahan and also remodeling of a historic mansion to an art school. The latter project was a very enriching project that entailed a postmodern design, while respecting the culture and historical theme of the site and also developing a modern environment to address the continuing needs of students. The Master program in Interior Architecture, at UCLA, gave her a chance to think globally, familiarize herself with western design as well as sustainability ethics that are indispensable in modern architecture.

To find out what it takes to win the Hirsch Bedner Scholarship, we interviewed Shaghayegh about her project and also asked her some questions that prospective students would find valuable:

 Please describe your project?

Studio III was a great experience for me thanks to professor Carvalheiro who provided me with invaluable guidance through the course of the project. Our project was to design a multipurpose environment with a focus on hydroponic gardening system.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?


We were to design a hydroponic gardening system, and I was inspired by several components: Historical Persian gardens, specifically the plan dimension and the ratio of the open space to the built space in these gardens; The ziggurat-shape structure of Babylon hanging gardens in Persia; The Damian Hirst’s artworks that use glass boxes to showcase the meaning of life and death, at the same time. The ziggurat glass structure in my design keeps the hydroponic system inside it, which is a symbol of life. The material for this structure is dichroic glass that displays different colors by undergoing a color change in certain lighting conditions.

As a piece of advice for students who are looking to pursue the Master of Interior Architecture program.:

Study programs in US are good opportunities for cultural exchange. You see many ambitious students coming from diverse cultures and historical backgrounds.  Your peers and instructors are among the best sources to get exposed to distinct cultures, to broaden your design ideas and to come up with new concepts. In a friendly environment, where people respect each other, different religions and cultures, we can all work much better. We, as artists and designers, can have a key role in creating a productive dialogue across the world.

Images of Shaghayegh Amirshaghaghi’s project:

The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship is a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted based upon the work demonstrated in projects commended not only for outstanding and innovative design solution, but also for the tremendous focus and professionalism displayed during the final design project.  To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

Congratulations to Beth Fortune, winner of the $3,000 Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship Award!

Beth Fortune 1Beth Fortune is a current student in the Advanced Level/Master’s Program and is new to the world of Interior Architecture, but not to design. Prior to enrolling in the Arc+ID program, Beth was an Art Director in advertising as well as a Photo Stylist. However, Interior Design is where she believes she belongs. “I’m excited to have found a career path in which there is endless opportunity for learning and growth,” Beth exclaims, “I’m eager to be part of a profession that makes people’s lives better by shaping and improving the spaces that surround them. I feel that I have found my place in the world.”

Beth was awarded the $3,000 Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship for her Studio III project, which was nominated by her instructor, Chinmaya Misra. Her project addressed dual-use programming with a furniture solutions company housing both showroom and offices in a 2,600 square-foot space in an historic downtown Los Angeles building.

“Studio III was a great introduction to the Master’s program. Professor Misra challenged students to take their projects to the next level. Her feedback was focused and very smart, and resulted in professional level projects from everyone in the class.”

From Design Communication I on, Beth has appreciated the real-world experience each Arc+ID instructor brings to class—and is grateful that so many instructors choose to give back to the profession by teaching.

We asked Beth to share a piece of advice for students who are looking to pursue the Master of Interior Architecture program. Here’s what she had to say: “Make the most of your time in school. It can be hard to appreciate when we’re overwhelmed with school work, but this is our time to experiment, learn, and find our design voices with support and feedback that, for the most part, does not exist in the professional world. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes, that’s the best way to learn. Oh, and to answer the age-old question of AutoCAD or Revit: both!”

Beth Fortune’s Studio III Project

Beth Fortune’s Studio III Project

Beth Fortune’s Studio III Project

The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship for Advanced Students a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted once a year to Masters students who have completed all classes up to and including Interior Architecture Studio III. The award is based upon the work demonstrated in projects from Interior Architecture Studio III. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

Congratulations to Carrie Cheung, winner of the $3,000 Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship Award!

carrie

With a Bachelor’s degree in Architectural Studies and over two years of work experience in architectural firms, international student Carrie Cheung, left her homeland of Hong Kong in December 2013 to pursue the Master of Interior Architecture program at UCLA Extension. “I believe studying abroad can widen my horizon,” Carrie stated in regards to her move to Los Angeles, “and bring me new inspiration and perspectives.”

While living in Hong Kong, Carrie worked on a number of upscale projects which included mix-use development in Mainland China, international competitions, theme park and casino development in Macau, and domestic projects in Hong Kong. “Having the opportunities to be part of those mega-scale projects and collaborating with the whole spectrum of expertise,” Carrie explained, “I found a need to further equip myself to the profession, with knowledge of the interior design discipline.”

Carrie has now completed the majority of classes in the Master’s program, including Studio III with Apurva Pande, the instructor who recognized her strong knack for design and nominated her for the Howard Hirsch scholarship. Carrie’s goal is to graduate by Summer 2015, after which she plans to apply the specialized skills and knowledge that she’ll gain from the Masters program to become a well-rounded architectural designer.

To find out what it takes to win the Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship, we interviewed Carrie about her project and also asked her some questions that prospective students would find valuable:

Please describe your project:
This is an adaptation project in a neo-classical building in Downtown LA. I preserved the arch windows, octagonal columns and the gold-leaf ceiling, and introduce a minimal, contemporary design to make a harmony. We were required to design a 3000 sq.ft. commercial space containing workspace and retail area, and, part of them can be converted to host Pop-up events. I challenge the limit of Pop-up, by creating a highly convertible shared workspace. It is an up-cycling furniture design studio at the daytime, and switches its function to design workshop and social forum after office hour. My design is established on the concept of folding tectonic. I include convertible furniture and sliding partition to meet the needs of different scenario.

First of all, I strategically included a transitional common zone between the retail (Public Area) and office (Private Area) during the space planning stage. The transitional zone refers to reception, conference room and café/rest area. Then, in response to the characteristic of the existing site, I developed a skewed grid as the principle in allocating my programs. The skewed grid gave me a lot more potential in developing interesting geometry when I was applying my design concept to create the central partition. The resulted sculptural central partition made a statement for my project.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?
As Pop-up space is one of the required programs in the project, I developed my concept, folding tectonic, basing on the pop-up paper art. I researched on some paper art forms and made a series of paper models to study the relationship between folding and volume growth, to seek a suitable form for my design. By combining the skewed grid which I developed in the early stage of my project, the pop-up paper models meet the spatial and functional needs, also with an elegant geometric shape.

How will the scholarship help you meet your career goals and aspirations?
I am very grateful for this scholarship, which allows me to spare some money from the tuition in the Master Program. However, spend them on some other meaningful ways of building my design capacity and getting inspirations, for instance, purchasing model making tools and materials; reference books; exhibition tickets and traveling.

What is the best piece of advice you can offer to prospective Master of Interior Architecture students?
Studios in the Master of Interior Architecture Program stress on striking a balance between creativity and practicality. Supported by other courses, such as the understanding of building code, ecology of design and project management, studios provide a dynamic testing ground for students to explore, establish and develop interior design ideas. It is intense, yet a very rewarding program, where I get inspired at every class, especially when I am collaborating with colleagues and instructors with diverse cultural and professional backgrounds. The training in this program makes me confident in pursuing my dream to be a successful architectural designer in the future.

Images of Carrie Cheung’s project:

The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship for Advanced Students a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted once a year to Masters students who have completed all classes up to and including Interior Architecture Studio III. The award is based upon the work demonstrated in projects from Interior Architecture Studio III. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.

 

Congratulations to Romina Hausmann, winner of the $3,000 Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship Award!

romina

Since she was seventeen years old, Romina Hausmann knew that her professional career would evolve in the field of art and its relation to design. Before finding her true passion in architecture & interior design, she attended ESCAC (School of Cinema and Audiovisuals of Catalonia) for 4 years, specializing in Art Direction, where she worked alongside Hollywood professionals such as film producer and director Steven Soderbergh as well as art director Iñigo Navarro.

After several years of working in the industry, Romina developed a growing interest in sustainability in the built environment. “I began to ask myself how I could use my love for art and architectural spaces in responsible designs,” Romina remarked, and ultimately decided that the best way to pursue this interest was through the UCLA Extension Architecture & Interior Design Certificate program.

During her education, Romina’s talents shone brightly—raising the attention of many of her instructors. Luis de Moraes, a UCLA Extension Design Studio II instructor, asked her to be his teaching assistant and has been enjoying her support for about a year now. Also, both Alex Dorfman (Design Communication III instructor) and Judith Corona (Elements of Design II instructor) requested that her outstanding work be showcased for the 2014 CIDA accreditation review. And just recently, her Studio III instructor, Apurva Pande, acknowledged her superior talents by recommending her as a candidate for the Howard Hirsch Scholarship. In addition to this scholarship, Romina is also the recipient of the Harold Grieve Scholarship offered through ASID on September 2014 as well as the Graduate Presidential Fellowship Award offered through Cal Poly Pomona on March 2015.

Earning her Certificate of Interior Design from UCLA Extension gave her the necessary knowledge of design to prepare her for the next step in her education: the Masters of Interior Architecture program at UCLA Extension via Cal Poly Pomona. Romina knew that by pursuing her Master’s degree, she would be able to better answer the needs of ecological design. “Finding sustainable design solutions is a long, ambitious and difficult road,” she states, “but there is no other way.” Romina, fluent in four major languages, plans to apply her learning experiences internationally, sharing her knowledge and creativity necessary for the development of a more ethically conscious, responsible, and better world.

To find out what it takes to win the Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship, we interviewed Romina about her project and also asked her some questions that prospective students would find valuable:

Please describe your project:
In Studio III, we had to come up with an idea for a commercial space that would be divided between retail area, working space and private area. From the beginning I knew I wanted to create an innovative design avoiding the conventional use of the walls and dividing the space with the product itself, using it as a partitions and display at the same time.

How did you come up with the concept for your project?
The strongest feature on my project is the relation between the product I’m selling (in this case the Shade Sails) and the partitions of the rooms. I was looking for an unconventional design that avoid the use of walls and instead use the product (Shade Sails) for display and partitions of the space. After experimenting with mock-up scale models, I came up with the idea of the Hyperbolic Paraboloid, which is directly related to the geometric form of the Shade Sail. After I found this relation it was easy to design the partitions based on this geometrical principle and use it at the same time as a display for the product.

How will the scholarship help you meet your career goals and aspirations?
The Howard Hirsch Scholarship will help me to continue my education on the Master Program in Interior Architecture at UCLA Extension/Cal Poly Pomona. It is really encouraging to know that your efforts and hard work is recognized. This will push me even further to keep experimenting and trying new creative and innovative points of view on my future designs.

What is the best piece of advice you can offer to prospective Master of Interior Architecture students?
I personally recommend trying to design every project from a holistic point of view. The best way to success is to experiment and try different options, trying to approach the project from a creative and also practical point of view. I strongly recommend experimenting with real architectural scale models. I would never have achieved my final results if it wasn’t for the tactile experience with the different materials and shapes I try to create. Computer comes last.

Images of Romina Hausmann’s project:

The Howard Hirsch Design Scholarship for Advanced Students a $3,000 tuition credit award that is granted once a year to Masters students who have completed all classes up to and including Interior Architecture Studio III. The award is based upon the work demonstrated in projects from Interior Architecture Studio III. To find out if you are eligible for this scholarship or others, please see the Arc+ID Scholarships and Financial Aid information page.

If you have a success story, we want to hear about it!  Click here.